Brontosaurus
Brontosaurus is a sauropod dinosaur from the Jurassic period of North America. It was originally a different genus from Apatosaurus, but the type species Brontosaurus excelsus was reclassified as a species of Apatosaurus called Apatosaurus excelsus, meaning Brontosaurus was considered scientifically invalid for over 110 years. However, an extensive study published in 2015 by a joint research team of United Kingdom and Portugal concluded that&nb...
Micropachycephalosaurus
Micropachycephalosaurus is a genus of ceratopsid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of China. Although originally believed to be a pachycephalosaurid, hence the name, it was reclassified as a ceratopsid in 2011. At 23 letters, Micropachycephalosaurus currently has the longest name of any known dinosaur.
Alamosaurus
Alamosaurus was an American Titanosaur. It was found in Texas. It was named after Ojo Alamo, a formation in Texas, where it was first discovered. It was the last sauropod known from North America, and may well have been prey to Tyrannosaurus. It was one of the last Sauropods. The name Alamosaurus means "Lizard from the Alamo". It was about 56–70 feet long and weighed about 30 tons.
Procompsognathus
Procompsognathus (pronounced /ˌproʊkɒmpˈsɒɡnəθəs/) is a genus of small theropod dinosaur that lived during the Late Triassic Period, about 222 to 219 million years ago. Procompsognathus was named by Eberhard Fraas in 1913. He named the type species, P. triassicus, on the basis of a poorly-preserved skeleton found in Württemberg, Germany. Procompsognathus may have been about 1.2 meters long (4 feet). A biped, it had long hind legs,...
Deinosuchus
Deinosuchus was a giant relative of the alligator that lived in North America during the Cretaceous period and probably hunted hadrosaurs. Despite its appearance and name, Deinosuchus was more closely related to alligators than to crocodiles. It is estimated to have been 12 meters (40 ft) long and much larger than modern alligators, they are believed to have had lifespans of eighty years, far longer than most dinosaurs. Deinosuchus&nb...
Archaeornithomimus
Archaeornithomimus is a genus of theropod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous of China, 70 million years ago. It is related to the more famous Gallimimus, Struthiomimus and Ornithomimus, lived in the same manner, possibly living in flocks, eating everything from small mammals, to plants and fruit, eggs, to insects, and even hatchlings of other Asian dinosaurs. However, they were also the potential prey for the larger Tyrannosaurids, such as Tarbosaurus.
Diplodocus
Diplodocus is a very famous giant Jurassic plant-eater. It was a huge, long-necked dinosaur, reaching lengths of up to 30 meters (100 feet) long. In fact, it is the longest complete dinosaur skeleton ever discovered. Since its hind legs were longer than its front legs, Diplodocus probably ate plants that were low to the ground. It was so big, however, that it could push trees over in order to get the leaves at the top down to the ground. It would probably stand on its hind ...
Dimetrodon
Dimetrodon was a pelycosaur, one of a number of animals known as Mammal-Like Reptiles (more accurately synapsids) that dominated the late Permian period. It was a large meat-eater that lived primarily in swampy areas and had a very interesting feature - a large sail on its back. Although often mistaken for a dinosaur, it died out long before dinosaurs evolved and is more closely related to modern mammals. Unlike other pelycosaurs that did not have fins, Dimetrodon was ab...
Pachyrhinosaurus
Pachyrhinosaurus, meaning "thick-nosed lizard", was a medium sized centrosaurine ceratopsian that lived in the Late Cretaceous Period of North America around 72-70 million years ago. It's most defining feature was its huge, bony mass, or lump, on its face. It was about 20 feet long and about 10 feet tall. It was closely related to Styracosaurus and more distantly related to Triceratops.  
Dilophosaurus
Dilophosaurus was one of the largest carnivorous dinosaurs of the Early Jurassic Period. Dilophosaurus gets its name from the two thin crests of bone on the top of its head. These were probably used as a display for courtship purposes (it's unlikely that it had a frill like the movie suggests). Dilophosaurus has been found in the United States. As a more primitive predatory dinosaur, Dilophosaurus didn't have forward facing eyes to give it ste...
Lesothosaurus
Lesothosaurus is an omnivorous ornithischian dinosaur. It was named by paleontologist Peter Galton in 1978, the name meaning "lizard from Lesotho". The genus is monotypic, having only one valid species, Lesothosaurus diagnosticus, within the genus.
Coelurus
Coelurus (see - LURE - us) was a small predator that walked on two legs. Many of its bones had very thin walls, making them very light. Coelurus may have been one of the fastest of the dinosaurs, as it was lightweight and had long legs. It probably had very good eyesight as well, and may have had feathers. Coelurus would have preferred small, easily captured prey. It is possible that it was shy and avoided contact with heavier animals, as it could not have been very...
Segisaurus
Segisaurus is an Early Jurassic meat-eater that seemed adapted for life in a dry, sandy environment. Though all early dinosaur predators had evolved to be quicker than the animals they replaced, scientists believe Segisaurus has features that made it extra fast. The North American landscape where Segisaurus lived was very arid and sandy. This little dinosaur seemed to have features that would have made it well adapted to squatting down and sitting out...
Protoceratops
The Protoceratops is the first ancestor of the famous ceratopsian family to resemble the later, more famous members such as Triceratops. Roughly the size of a sheep, it was therefore much smaller than its more famous relatives but had a very successful design that lasted for many millions of years. Protoceratops didn't have horns to protect itself with, just its sharp beak to bite with. It is a fairly common fossil, being one of the few dinosaurs that&...
Teratophoneus
Teratophoneus ("monstrous murderer" (Greek: teras, "monster" and phoneus, "murderer") is a genus of carnivorous tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur which lived during the late Cretaceous period (late Campanian age, about 77 to 76 million years ago) in what is now Utah, United States, containing a single known species, T. curriei. It is known from an incomplete skull and postcranial skeleton recovered from the Kaiparowits Formation. It was specifically named ...
Kosmoceratops
Kosmoceratops is a genus of herbivorous chasmosaurine ceratopsian dinosaur, which lived during the Late Cretaceous period (late Campanian) in the part of the island continent Laramidia that is now Utah, United States. Its fossils have been recovered from the Kaiparowits Formation in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, living with Deinosuchus, Nasutoceratops, Parasaurolophus, Troodon, Teratophoneus, and more. Kosmoceratops i...
Peloroplites
Peloroplites (from Greek pelor "monster", and hoplites, "armoured soldier") is a genus of nodosaurid armored dinosaur from Lower Cretaceous rocks of Utah, United States. It is known from a partial skull and partial postcranial remains from the base of the Mussentuchit Member of the Cedar Mountain Formation, deposited during the Albian-Cenomanian boundary, about 104.46 to 98.37 million years ago, and was found in Emery County, Utah. It was named in 2008 by Kenneth ...
Deinonychus
Deinonychus was the first of the raptors (technically called "Dromaeosaurs") to be known from a nearly complete skeleton. Velociraptor had been discovered forty years earlier but was known only from a skull and a few bones of its hands and feet.[1] The skeleton of Deinonychus were first to show the now infamous sickle-shaped retractable foot claw (8 inch), used for ripping open the skin of a victim, causing the preys guts be ripped and with a consider...
Titanosaurus
Titanosaurus was among the last of the giant sauropods to walk the Earth. This was a giant plant-eater from the same family as Argentinosaurus. It was probably related to dinosaurs that traveled from South America when it was still connected to Africa. The entire family of these Cretaceous giants is named after this dinosaur, even though only a few bones of Titanosaurus have ever been found. Titanosaurus was a heavily built sauropod, as is typical for this fami...
Dracorex
Dracorex is a dubious genus of pachycephalosaur from the Late Cretaceous Period. Its name means Dragon King, and its type species is Dracorex hogswartia, named after the Harry Potter Franchise's Hogwarts Academy. Much like Stygimoloch, Dracorex had large, protruding spikes on the back of its head, with two large horns of three behind the head. It had bumps and a long muzzle, with spikes on its nasal area. Dracorex, like Homalocephale and ...
Concavenator
Concavenator is a genus of primitive carcharodontosaurian from the Early Cretaceous Period. It was slightly taller than a man, being no more than 20 feet long. It was named after its distinguishing hump on its back, which was located in front of the hips. The shape was two hills, the front being taller and more visible than the one on the back, which is barely noticeable, with a U-shape in the middle, although looks less like a U-shape due to the small second hump behind the tall,...
Ceratosaurus
Ceratosaurus was a medium sized carnivore that lived at the same time as the larger Allosaurus, in the Late Jurassic period. However, it also lived some millions of years before the emergence of the successful allosauroids, being of the more primitive four fingered Ceratosauria. What makes it different and distinctive is the large horn on top of its nose and the two horns over its eyes. The use of it has been debated and is most likely used for display, a weapon, or a special us...
Dreadnoughtus
Dreadnoughtus was a large titanosaur sauropod that lived in the Late Cretaceous period of South America. It is the most complete titanosaur ever discovered, and is widely considered the heaviest dinosaur to ever exist. The holotype fossil is considered a juvenile, however, so it's likely Dreadnoughtus could grow much larger.
Indoraptor
The Indoraptor was a new hybrid dinosaur that was created secretly by Dr. Henry Wu in the Lockwood Manor basement lab.
Stegoceratops
Stegoceratops is a hybrid of Stegosaurus, Triceratops, a beetle and a snake. Despite appearing in the toy line and game adaptation of Jurassic World, it did not appear in the film itself.
Indominus rex
Indominus rex was the latest attraction in Jurassic World. The hybrid was created by combining the genetic traits of multiple species. Some of the known species that were used in the creation of the hybrid are Tyrannosaurus rex, Velociraptor, Carnotaurus, Giganotosaurus, Majungasaurus, Rugops, Pycnonemosaurus, Quilmesaurus, Viavenator, Deinosuchus, and Therizinosaurus,[2] as well as modern animals like cuttlef...
Proceratosaurus
Proceratosaurus was a primitive coelurosaurian theropod that lived in England, Europe in the Middle Jurassic Period. It looked somewhat similar to the later Ceratosaurus, for which it is named after, but only due to it also having a horn-like crest. Despite its name, it is not related to Ceratosaurus, but to the later Tyrannosaurus. Overall, Proceratosaurus was a much more gracile and delicate animal. Recent research has speculated with...
Microceratus
Microceratus is a genus of small ceratopsian dinosaur that lived in the Cretaceous period in Asia. It would have used its sharp beak to bite off the leaves or needles. In the first Jurassic Park novel, they spend most of their time in the trees. It became known as Microceratops when it was first discovered in 1953, but that name was already occupied by a wasp with the same name. The replacement name Microceratus was created by Mateus in 2008 for ...
Edmontosaurus
Edmontosaurus was a large herbivorous dinosaur that lived during the Late Cretaceous period. Its name means "Edmonton lizard" after the location of its discovery (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada). It has two junior synonyms, Anatosaurus and Anatotitan. Edmontosaurus is part of the Hadrosauridae, or duckbill family of dinosaurs, who are known for their amazing teeth - or as paleontologists call it, their "dental battery&quo...
Velociraptor
Velociraptor, in real life, was a genus of dromaeosaurid theropod dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous period which inhabited what is now the Mongolia-China border with other unique dinosaurs. Velociraptor was no bigger than a wolf and with its feathers it bore a very bird-like appearance that would make it all the more different from the films, being more akin to a flightless hawk. It had a long claw ("terrible claw") on ...
Suchomimus
Suchomimus ("crocodile mimic") was a spinosaurid dinosaur. It seems to be a close relative to Spinosaurus, and looks very similar to this star of Jurassic Park III. Suchomimus, however, lacked the tall spines and large sail of its famous cousin since its vertebrae were much smaller. "It was a dinosaur trying hard to be a crocodile," says paleontologist Paul Sereno after he discovered a Suchomimus tenerensis during an expedition to Afric...
Troodon
Troodon is a dubious small bird-like Theropod. It has very long legs with specialized feet, in which the middle long bone was pinched out at the top to form a shock-absorbing wedge. This allowed it to run very fast. Troodon had very large eyes that faced mostly forward, so that it could focus better. It is famous for having one of the largest brains (for its body size) of any dinosaur making it the most intelligent. Troodon had a jaw full of many small teeth, b...
Herrerasaurus
Herrerasaurus ("[Victorino] Herrera's lizard") was one of the oldest and most primitive Theropods, or meat-eating dinosaurs, though in its day it was relatively hyper-advanced. Its body displayed many of the same features of the later theropods. It walked on its hind legs, which sported feet with five digits each with the middle three being able to bear weight, and its arms ended in a long five-digit hand with the first three ending in powerful claws used for grasp...
Pteranodon
Pteranodon is a large flying reptile. When it spread its wings, it could reach from the front to the back of a school bus. It did not have feathers, but rather had a basal type of integument along the same lineage from which feathers evolved, called pycnofibers. Pycnofibers were very hair-like in appearance and, like hair, were made of keratin. Members of the Pterosaur order lived through much of the Mesozoic, some species of Pterosaurs with wingspans close to 11 meters ...
Dimorphodon
Dimorphodon ("two-form tooth") is a pterosaur believed to belong to the family Rhamphorhynchoidea from the Early Jurassic Period of southern England. The species is unique among pterosaurs because it has two types of teeth like that of a mammal.
Mosasaurus
Mosasaurus was a genus of large aquatic carnivorous lizard from the Late Cretaceous about 70-66 million years ago. Mosasaurus gave its name to a group of marine lizards - Mosasaurs. Mosasaurus means 'Meuse Lizard', referring to the river near which it was first found. It fed on such prey as seabirds, sharks, large fish, plesiosaurs and even other mosasaurs.
Compsognathus
Compsognathus is one of the smallest known dinosaurs that was first featured in The Lost World: Jurassic Park. This little pack hunter probably ate bugs and small lizards. In fact, the first fossil skeleton of this dinosaur had the remains of its last meal, a lizard, still in its stomach. Compsognathus is one of those dinosaurs around which some controversy swirls. Some paleontologists feel that, like the much larger Tyrannosaurus, the little Compsognathus had...
Stygimoloch
Stygimoloch is a dubious genus of the pachycephalosaur family living in the late Cretaceous period. It was distinguished from other pachycephalosaurs by the row of spikes on the back of its head, behind the dome characteristic of the family. Jack Horner has presented evidence in 2009 (and others after him) that suggests that Stygimoloch might be the juvenile form of Pachycephalosaurus.
Gallimimus
Gallimimus was a speedy theropod, the largest of its type. They were called chicken mimics because they probably moved like modern flightless birds. Unlike other theropods, Gallimimus had no teeth. In fact, it had a very small head. This was probably one of the fastest dinosaurs, with speed like an ostrich, it could probably run up to 30 miles per hour. With its small, toothless head, it is believed that Gallimimus probably had a diet of insects, small animals, egg...
Parasaurolophus
Parasaurolophus is a hadrosaurid (sometimes referred to as the duck-billed dinosaurs) from approximately 76.5–73 million years ago (late Cretaceous). It is a herd animal feeding on the park’s rich vegetation. The most stunning feature of the Parasaurolophus is the crest on its head. Scientists were unsure of its function until today. Some believed it was a snorkel for when the animal was in the water, others felt that it was used in combat. We now know that...
Pachycephalosaurus
Pachycephalosaurus is the last, largest, and most famous member of the Pachycephalosauria, or thick-headed dinosaurs. In the 1970s paleontologist Peter Galton proposed that male pachycephalosaurs used their dome heads as battering rams, like Bighorn sheep. The idea caught the public's imagination, and two individuals are seen doing this in The Lost World: Jurassic Park (of course, these are genetically engineered dinosaurs and not necessarily exactly the...
Carnotaurus
Carnotaurus ("meat-eating bull"), was one of the most bizarre yet dangerous meat-eating dinosaurs ever found. Its skull was short, with spiked armor on the top and a pair of knobby horns over its small eyes. The neck and shoulder blades were well developed, but the arms were incredibly short, with forearms so shrunken they were practically just wrists; not even Tyrannosaurus rex had such small arms.[1] With its small skull, Carnotaurus might not have been...
Brachiosaurus
Brachiosaurus is a member of the sauropod family and one of the most well known of all dinosaurs. It gets its name from the great height of its humerus, or upper arm bone - which is longer than most humans are tall. For almost a century, Brachiosaurus was considered the tallest of all dinosaurs, being over nine metres tall. Since then, other dinosaurs have been discovered to have been taller. Originally discovered in 1900 in Colorado, Brachiosaurus was named in...
Ankylosaurus
Ankylosaurus was built like a living tank, with extremely thick, bony plates of armor on its body, even including armored eyelids. Its tail also had a second function; it could act as a deadly club. The club was used to swing around and smash into an attacking dinosaur. Its club was so daunting that not even a Tyrannosaurus rex, would want to mess with this alarming species.[1] As a defensive creature, Ankylosaurus was one of nature's most perfect designs. It was al...
Corythosaurus
Corythosaurus is a hadrosaur dinosaur that lived in the Late Cretaceous period. Its name means "Helmet lizard".  Corythosaurus had hundreds of small interlocking teeth at the back of its jaw, allowing it to crush and grind plant matter. The bony crest on top of its head contained its nasal passage and may have been used as a sounding device. Like other duckbills and some other late Cretaceous plant-eating dinosaurs, Corythosaurus had huge num...
Spinosaurus
Spinosaurus ("spined lizard") was a theropod dinosaur that existed in what is now North Africa during the Cretaceous period. Spinosaurus is the largest of all known carnivorous dinosaurs, even larger than Carcharodontosaurus, Giganotosaurus, and Tyrannosaurus rex. Its most distinctive feature was the huge sail-like fin on its back. This sail was made from spines that come out of the top of the backbones of all dinosaurs and al...
Tyrannosaurus rex
Tyrannosaurus rex is arguably the most famous dinosaur of them all. Tyrannosaurus was the last and largest of the Tyrannosaurs. Commonly known as "T. rex", this species lived during the Late Cretaceous Period in modern day North America and was therefore among one of the last non-avian dinosaurs. In popular culture, Tyrannosaurus has an iconic status shared by few other species. Like other tyrannosaurids, Tyrannosaurus had ver...
Apatosaurus
Apatosaurus is one of the most famous of the giant Jurassic plant-eaters. It was a sauropod, a member of a race of huge, long-necked dinosaurs. It was longer than two school buses and weighed as much as 4 adult male African elephants. For years, an Apatosaurus body stood with the head of Camarasaurus on the end of its neck. This was named Brontosaurus and was one of the most popular dinosaurs for many years. In 2015, the Brontosaurus genus was revi...
Stegosaurus
Stegosaurus is easily one of the best known dinosaurs and is recognized all over the world. It is the largest and most famous member of the stegosaur family. It roamed the open plains of the Late Jurassic Period in what is now North America. The plates along its back, its small head and spiked tail make it a peculiar and unique dinosaur. This plant-eater evolved to find its food in the low-growing plants of the late Jurassic. The spikes on its tail would have made a po...
Allosaurus
Allosaurus ("different lizard") was the most common predator of the Late Jurassic period and the most dangerous. Like most meat-eating dinosaurs, its jaws were filled with serrated teeth shaped like blades. Computer studies suggest that Allosaurus attacked by using its upper jaw like a machete to hack at its victim, then it used its lower jaw to bite out a slice of meat, although recent studies have proven this unlikely. In terms of size, it was the thir...
Nasutoceratops
Nasutoceratops was a centrosaurine ceratopsian dinosaur found in Utah, USA during the late Cretaceous Period, around 77-75 million years ago. It had a short yet thick snout and large horns above its eyes that extended almost to the end of its beak-like mouth. The horns are the longest brow-horns of all members of the centrosaurine sub-family but rather than growing straight out their horns would grow to the side and then out, similar to a bulls horns. It shared its habitat with...
Mamenchisaurus
Mamenchisaurus is one of the most unique long-necked dinosaurs for a very good reason - it has a really long neck. In fact, it had the longest neck of any creature that ever lived. Stretching 18 metres (60 feet), the neck on Mamenchisaurus was longer than a school bus. The rest of it was just like other members of its family; a long tail, with stout legs. Mamenchisaurus had 19 neck vertebrae, more than any other dinosaur. The vertebrae had long struts running between them that wo...
Maiasaura
Maiasaura, a Hadrosaurid genus, famous as a "good mother lizard," as fossils show it cared for its young. Maiasaura also were light weight for their size and could run. It lived in North America about 75 million years ago, probably the direct ancestor of the Hadrosaur Edmontosaurus. It was named by Jack Horner and Robert Makela in 1979. Astronaut Loren Acton took a bone fragment and eggshell piece of a Maiasaura on an 8-day Spacelab 2 ...
Hadrosaurus
Hadrosaurus was a genus of Hadrosaurid dinosaurs that lived in the late Cretaceous Period. It was described in 1858 by Joseph Leidy in Haddonfield, New Jersey. It's skull was never discovered, so it's head shape is debatable, whether it looked like that of Kritosaurus, which lived at the same time and place, or like that of later hadrosaurids, such as Edmontosaurus or Parasaurolophus.
Sinoceratops
Sinoceratops is a genus of ceratopsian that lived in China during the Late Cretaceous, living about 72-66 million years ago. Sinoceratops is a very significant centrosaur because not only it is the first ceratopsid to be ever discovered in China, but it is also one of the largest centrosaurines ever discovered. It lived alongside Shantungosaurus, Zhuchengtyrannus, and Zhuchengceratops. Like most centrosaurs, Sinoceratops had a single nasal horn and no ...
Baryonyx
Baryonyx is a Spinosaur, a member of the same group as the northern African dinosaurs Spinosaurus and Suchomimus. Baryonyx was smaller than these relatives but was still a big predator. It was 9.5 meters (31.2 feet) long and 2.5 meters (8.25 feet) high at the hips. Although studies in the fossils of Baryonyx, indicate that it had not yet reached its adult stage, so it could be larger, also another study found that there were vertebrae a little larger th...
Metriacanthosaurus
Metriacanthosaurus was a fairly large meat-eater that lived in Northern Europe near the end of the Jurassic Period. This carnivore was fairly typical of Jurassic theropods. Metriacanthosaurus gets its name for its backbones, which have spines on top that are taller than in many meat-eaters (such as Allosaurus or Tyrannosaurus) but much smaller than those of Spinosaurus. At one time Metriacanthosaurus was thought to be the same as&n...
Triceratops
Triceratops was a very common dinosaur which lived at the very end of the Cretaceous period. It had a huge frilled head with horns over each eye that could reach over 3 feet long. Triceratops had a third, smaller horn on its nose. These would be fearsome weapons against a predator. Triceratops is one of the most common dinosaur fossils found. More than 50 skulls have been found. Within the genus, at least 7 species have been identified. The ceratopsian family is one...
Dinosaur Hunter’s Guide